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Planning The Women’s March – A Silver Lining

Planning The Women’s March – A Silver Lining

I want to tell y’all about my mom. Like most women I know, the older I get the more I appreciate her and everything she has done to help me become the woman I am. Now, I don’t know if she directly set out to raise a feminist or activist, but she most definitely played an invaluable role in helping me become the person I am today.

 

 

My mom taught me what it meant for a woman to be an equal in the home and also run her own business. She taught me the importance of being aware of politics. She taught me the importance of voting. She taught me the importance of giving back and being a productive and active member of your community. I don’t remember her directly talking to me about any of these things, she always taught me through example.

On November 8th, there was no one I would have rather spent election day with than my mom. Before the results came in we sat around the kitchen table talking about how far women have come just from her generation to mine and what it would mean for us to have a woman president.

 

 

I don’t have to tell y’all what happened next. We were devastated, to say the least.

 

The day after the election I was having a hard time finding a reason to get out of bed and go to school. My mom reminded me that if I stop trying, that’s when they truly win. I had to keep learning, working, and doing all of the things I wanted to do, to show them I couldn’t be stopped.

In a clip from Late Night with Seth Myers, Amber Ruffin beautifully summed up this concept when she said –

“By doing what you do every day you prove to them that you are unstoppable. They can spend their time trying to pass laws to take way your rights and silence your voice but all you have to do is live your lives right in their faces and it proves to them that we simply cannot be stopped.”

When I heard about the Women’s March on Washington I wanted more than anything to be there, but knew it would be highly unlikely that I would be able to make the trip. I have a fair amount of activist experience and had organized rallies and marches in the past, so I started making a list of people to contact to start planning a Women’s March on Austin.

Later that very day I got on Facebook and saw I was not the first with this idea, an event page had been created. Shortly after I had a conversation with Melissa Fiero and joined the planning committee.

We were a group of strangers and in less than 50 days we organized what ended up being the largest protest in Texas history. We hoped for a few thousand marchers and final estimates reached 100,000. We could have never predicted such an amazing, warm, peaceful, and uplifting turn out. It was everything we dreamed of and so so much more. Thank you, to all who marched, for far beyond exceeding our expectations.

The day of the March, once again, there was one person I wanted by my side. My mom. She was so excited to be there. But the night before she called to tell me she had to go in for emergency eye surgery for a detached retina. As soon as it occurred to me that this meant she couldn’t march with me, my heart was broken. No matter how she tried to find a way around it, she was on specific doctor’s orders NOT to attend the march under any circumstances. Since we weren’t going to be able to take a photo together at the march, we took a picture together with signs the night before and she made me promise to still enjoy the march as if she was there.

View of the “March to the March” behind me.

 

The day of the march I was in the front with the banner and the dignitaries welcoming and directing marchers as they arrived. I had been focusing my attention towards the capitol and when I turned around to look down congress, I was completely blown away by what I saw. There was a flood of people filling the street walking north, towards the capitol. I immediately started jumping up and down, hugging my fellow organizers, and yelling, “there’s a march TO The March!!”

Then I looked to the east on 11th street and saw another flood of people. I looked west on 11th street, and it was the same scene. That was when it hit me how amazing and monumental this things we were doing was. We were truly making history. It was the happiest and most proud moment of my life.

 

 

 

Photo By Kristi Wright

 

For a moment I stood there, watching the wave of people walking towards me, and I shed a few tears. Overwhelmed by the love, support, and hope I felt from the people surrounding me and wishing my mom was there to see this absolutely majestic sight. Before that moment, I had many reasons for marching, from justice for sexual assault survivors, to my future children. But in that moment, I decided that above all, I was marching for my mom, and everything she taught me.

 

 

Since the Women’s March I have loved hearing stories of people’s experiences at the March. I can’t tell you how many women have told me “that march brought me back to life.” One woman told me that she hadn’t left her house since the election because she was so scared and depressed and when she went to the march she saw that she was not alone. That is what we at March On keep hearing over and over – “I thought I was the only one.”

                You are not alone.

Photo By Mike Holp Photography

 

After the election it would have been too easy for me, or any of us, to fall into a deep depression. And don’t get me wrong, it’s been hard, very hard, but my mom’s advice to keep working and keep doing what I do, no matter what, has kept me going. Planning the Women’s March gave me something positive to focus my energy into. It showed me the good in people, instead of being sucked into the bad.

 

The satisfaction you get from being involved in an issue you are passionate about is not something I currently have the words to describe.

 

So, I challenge you – decide what you are most passionate about. Is it women’s reproductive rights? Is it immigration rights? Is it electing progressive candidates to public office? Whatever it is, find a way to get involved. See for yourself just how satisfying, uplifting, and empowering it can be.

My mom has always taught me to find the bright side or the silver lining in bad situations. Without a doubt, my silver lining of the unexpected results of the 2016 presidential election is the number of everyday people it has motivated into political action.

Now is your time. Now is our time. To have a say in what happens next. To be the change. Don’t miss your chance, get involved, in whatever way that means for you.

March On! Texas!

 

 

Why I march on Texas

By Kevin Hopper

To understand why I march on Texas, you may need to know a little about me. Born and raised in Texas, I attended public Texas schools and colleges. Being the son of a Republican Air Force officer and a Democrat teacher, I understand that the issues that face this state are not partisan, they’re not black or white, and they’re not blue or red. But the truth is we live in a climate where politicians drive a wedge between neighbors and families in the interest of their own personal gain. I march on Texas because I realize the time is now to organize and take action.

 

After graduating from the University of North Texas, I moved to New York to pursue a career as a (struggling) freelancer. When I turned 26, I aged out of my parents’ healthcare. At the time, I was working multiple jobs and struggling just to stay afloat. So when I went to healtchare.gov to find coverage, I was shocked and relieved to find that I qualified for Medicaid. Perhaps I shouldn’t have been surprised, but coming from a state that refused to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, I had never seen the system work like it was supposed to. Being young and healthy, I never had to use my Medicaid, but knowing that I was covered in case of an emergency gave me and my parents great peace of mind.

 

Fast forward a couple years, I move back to Texas to pursue a Teacher’s Certification and a career as a Texas public school teacher. Having lost my status as a Texas resident, I spent my first year biding my time until I qualified for in-state tuition. During this time, my financial stability remained about the same as it was in New York (not stable at all), but one thing did change: I lost healthcare coverage.

 

Back on healthcare.gov, I looked up my options for health-insurance providers available to me. Because I lived in Texas, I no longer qualified for Medicaid. And without subsidies, the options available to me here were just not feasible to fit into my budget. Even with the minimum coverage, A $350 monthly premium and a $5000 deductible meant that I was too poor to have healthcare in the State of Texas. My healthcare plan became the emergency room, and there was nothing I could do about it.

 

What I saw on that page was not the failure of the Affordable Care Act, but the outcome of disruptive policies by Texas’ politicians who are willing to destabilize the lives of their own constituents in order to win a rhetorical game for their own gain in the national political theater.

 

When I hear Texans and Texas business owners saying the Affordable Care Act is broken, I can’t help but think to myself, ‘that’s because those in power in this state won’t let it work the way it was designed’. Yes, ACA is not perfect, but the truth has been distorted by disruptive Tea Party politics and self-interested politicians seeking to dismantle public interest, privatize power, and sell our state to corporate oligarchs.

 

I march on Texas because I believe in the public interest. I march on Texas because I believe we are all less free when oligarchs can dismantle our democratically created institutions against the will and interest of the people. And I march on Texas because the time is now to bring about the change we need in this state to ensure all Texans have access to preventative healthcare and are provided for when they are sick or in need of medicine.

6 Months After I Didn’t March

6 Months After I Didn’t March

“Where were you on the day of the Women’s March?”  It’s going to be one of those snapshot-in-time questions like, “Where were you on 9/11?”  This week, as we pause to reflect about unified civil disobedience, pink pussycat hats and a day of power, I’m almost ashamed to admit where I was:

Having a panic attack on a treadmill.

I had donated to Hillary’s campaign, but didn’t put a sign up on my lawn (too risky).  Half my family voted for Donald Trump and were openly gloating about it to the point where I stopped answering my text messages.

For decades I’ve been voting and everyone knows that you win some, you lose some; this was the first time ever though that I’ve felt scared by the outcome.  Yes, I was pro-Hillary, and although saddened that we didn’t make history with the first woman president, that’s not why I was crying on election night and hyperventilating on inauguration day.  I was (am still!) legitimately frightened that Donald Trump is in charge of the nuclear codes.

Who knew what things white supremacist Stephen K. Bannon was whispering into Donald Trump’s ear and how that would translate into law?  If Trump’s campaign rhetoric was true that would mean that he has a rubber stamp to pass his unconstitutional Muslim ban, reinstate “stop and frisk”, stop supporting the Paris Climate Accord, overturn Roe v. Wade and build that wall.  And with conservatives’ majorities in both chambers and now the Supreme Court too to rubber stamp his ideas, would I even recognize my own country four years from now? 

And then something wonderful happened.  Pictures of the Women’s March…in TEXAS…started entering my newsfeed.  People participated across the globe in the millions and even in Texas!  Suddenly I didn’t feel so alone anymore.  I wasn’t brave enough to go to the march, but they did.

Photo c/o Kristi Wright Photography

I remember reading in history class about peaceful protests and civil rights movements and wondering what I would do if I were in that situation.  Would I get involved or stay safely silent?  On the day of the Women’s March I went through some extreme vetting of my own morals and decided it was time for me to speak up. 

I went to a digital organizing class for Progressives, where I met Melissa Fierro who organized the march in Texas, shattering Texas history that day with 100,000 participants.  There was so much energy she and a group of volunteers formed March On! Texas to keep up the momentum.  March On! Texas has a mission to educate, motivate and activate women to help speak out for issues important to us and to help elect Progressives at the local level. 

Since volunteering with them, I’ve regained a sense of power and optimism that was crushed during the entire campaign season.  Some of the things I participated in included:

·         Blue Ribbon Lobby Day – groups of us got to meet with our representatives at the state capitol and talk about local legislation that was important to us, including women’s reproductive rights, public education and health care. 

Blue Ribbon Lobby Day

·         Help craft and send out weekly marching orders that gave three actions to do that week to help promote our Progressive agenda.

·         Wrote letters to both senators and did a blog post explaining how healthcare directly impacted me and my family and encouraged others to do the same.

·         We asked people throughout the state of Texas to send us names of Progressives running for local elections.  Marchers identified over 70 names, 45 of them women!  One volunteer created an interactive map that linked to candidates’ websites to get the word out.

·         We reached out to the candidates, encouraged people to attend meet-and-greets, volunteer, fundraise, and of course get out there and vote!  16 progressive candidates won, which is a step in the right direction, and also shows us how much further we need to keep going.

Beto O’Rourke with March On Texas women

·         Volunteers supported other groups by sharing events on our calendar and attending marches and information sessions.  If you attended a march for the environment, LBGTQIA, Muslim rights, civil rights, town halls and/or reproductive rights chances are you met someone from March On! Texas there too.

·         In the day of “fake news” and “alternative facts” we have strived to share accurate information through our Facebook page from credible sources and blog posts educating and inspiring people to learn more about local politics and how we can make a difference.

·         We strive to share stories of everyday activists, feminist powerhouses and artists standing up for values we believe in.

The New Activists

So, my message to anyone out there who didn’t march on that day is that you can still make a difference!  Don’t beat yourself up for missing out on one march, because that was yesterday and this is today.   Life is full of small choices you make each and every day and I hope you choose to join us in supporting local Progressive candidates and fighting for women’s rights, equal rights and an inclusive American society.  Let’s make Texas blue again!

March on, y’all!

What’s the #NRA2DOJ Women’s March About?

What’s the #NRA2DOJ Women’s March About?

You may or may not have heard about the #NRA2DOJ Women’s March to take place this weekend in Virginia.  Here are some facts about it:

The Women’s March in Washington D.C. happened the day after President Trump’s inauguration and inspired sister marches around the world.  The march was organized around Martin Luther King Jr.’s principles of non-violent civil protests.  If you attended the march, or saw pictures from it, you viewed millions of women, men and children peacefully marching and holding up signs that promoted unity.

Part of this unity includes standing up for principles progressives believe in, including racial equality.

On July 6, 2016, Philando Castile, an African American school employee, was pulled over by police officer Jeronimo Yanez in Minnesota for a routine traffic stop.  When Castile mentioned to the police officer that he had a gun in the car (which he had a permitted license to carry) he was shot, even though he was following Yanez’s instructions to show his driver’s license.   His girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, and her four-year-old daughter were in the car with him to him.  Reynolds live-streamed the aftermath on Facebook, as Philando moaned next to her.  He died 20 minutes later in the hospital.  (Officer Yanez was since acquitted of all charges.)

The NRA (National Rifle Association) is usually very vocal about the right to bear arms, their stated mission.  But in this particular instance, when a black man with a gun permit was shot by a police officer, they said absolutely nothing in his defense.

The Women’s March called the NRA to take action on this point.  Soon after, the NRA posted a right-wing activist ad that promotes an “us vs. them” scenario implying that progressives marching for civil rights are violent and a threat.  You can see the ad here:

“In response, Women’s March co-president Tamika Mallory penned an open letter to the NRA calling for the ad to be removed and an apology to be issued to the American public for the false and inflammatory rhetoric.  Instead of distancing themselves from the vitriol, the NRA responded by releasing a new video attacking Tamika and other leaders personally and doubling down on the implied call to arms. This is the kind of incendiary speech that leads to acts of hate and violence, and it is unequivocally meant to create a chilling effect on communities speaking up and using the power of our collective voice.” (Letter from the Women’s March).

After that, the Women’s March decided to organize a peaceful protest to demonstrate the following things:

On July 14th & 15th, Women’s March and partners will mobilize a mass demonstration, again grounded in the principles of Kingman nonviolence, to denounce the false and intimidating rhetoric of hatred and send a clear message that our movement will proudly and bravely continue to strive for the respect of the civil and human rights of all people.

Here are the details of the #NRA2DOJ March:

For more details you can go directly to their website here: WomensMarch.

The New Activists

The New Activists

We range from college students to women who marched in the 1960’s.  We are mothers and millennials and nasty women.  And if you call us “snowflakes” we’ve got news for you:

Winter is Coming.

Most of us were fans of politics, but we never really got in the game.  We might donate money to a candidate, but never walk the block for them.  We might post a meme on Facebook, but never actively engaged with our neighbors.  Not really.

Not until Donald Trump became President Trump.

And then we marched.  And then realized that marching wasn’t enough.  March On! Texas started as a sister march but it has grown since then.  Our goals are to go local and focus on how we can turn Texas blue again.

The New Activists

Did you know that Texas used to be led by Democrats?  Despite the gerrymandering done after the 2010 census, a lot of us still exist.

On election night we progressives in the shadows were hoping to shatter the glass ceiling for that highest, hardest wall; instead we were shattered to find that despite losing the popular vote by 3,000,000, Donald Trump became the leader of our country.

He bragged about sexually assaulting women.  He openly discriminated against Muslims, immigrants, the disabled and people of color.  His foreign policy changed with the wind, he put white supremacists, climate-change-deniers and people with zero experience in positions of power, and his son Don Jr. just tweeted out an email chain showing his campaign loved the idea of getting dirt on Hillary Clinton directly from the Russian government.

All this could have left us collapsed and destroyed, believing that the system is rigged and we are powerless, but on the contrary we are stronger.  Democrats were broken but the new Progressive activists are rising up empowered.

  • Our notions of just donating money and hoping for the best are shattered.
  • Our excuses for not getting involved are shattered.
  • Our trust in leaving it up to someone else has been shattered.

We are the new activists.

We love our country.  We are putting ourselves on the line and we will not stop until we see progressives and moderates back in power.

And we need help from people like you.

For more information, please go to our website www.MarchOnTexas.com.

March on y’all!

Civility

Civility

By Melissa Fierro

Civility… It’s a two-way street.  Bitch, slut,  pig she was bleeding from wherever,  low IQ, crazy.  Words we hear nearly every day coming from  our president.  Not presidential?  No.  Language of the gutter?  Yes.  Exclusive to Donald Trump?  Not by a long shot.

We are appalled and outraged at the low level of discourse our president seems to think is okay.  He is president of the United States of America!  He should hold himself to a higher moral standard!  He should set a better example for our children! But what level of moral standard do we hold ourselves to?  What kind of example are we setting for our children?

Everyday I see posts on Facebook making pejorative comments about Kellyanne Conway’s looks or calling her a bitch.  Ivanka Trump is  a bimbo, slut or worse.  Sarah Huckabee Sanders is a fat cow or stupid.  And the president is called names so vile that if our kids said it, we would ground them for a month.  People in glass houses better be careful of throwing stones.

Cartoon by Darrin Bell

Now don’t get me wrong.  I am not trying to preach or get on my moral high horse.  I can’t stand the sight of Donald Trump.  The sound of his voice makes my skin crawl. (And for those of you who know me, I have the mouth of a sailor.)  And I have been guilty of every single thing I mentioned above.

But I started recognizing the hypocrisy of being appalled at those on the right for doing or condoning what I was guilty of doing myself.  And I realized when I heard my husband call a woman on the right something unsavory my blood pressure would rise and I found myself defending them.

Why?

Because we cannot expect more from others than we expect from ourselves.  A simple truth most of us forget in our horror and anger at what is being done to our country.  And the manner and style in which DJT chooses to do it.  But, as Michelle Obama famously said and has so often been quoted, “When they go low we go high.” Let’s go high people.

Beat them at the polls, not at their own game.

Um, I Agree With Ted Cruz?

Um, I Agree With Ted Cruz?

At March On Texas we pretty much never agree with anything Senator Ted Cruz says or does.  Until now.

Senator Cruz is one of the reasons why Mitch McConnell pulled the Republican version of the healthcare bill from the floor without taking a vote but is trying to put it up for a vote by Friday.  The senate needs 50 votes to repeal and replace Obamacare, meaning only two Republicans could vote against it, and Senator Cruz was one who flat out said no.

Yay!

Now granted, the reasons why he said no (the bill was too generous) versus why we said no (22 million people would lose their coverage, Medicaid would be cut – kicking out old people from nursing homes and pregnant women from prenatal care, the bill would raise premiums up to five times higher than the youngest for adults in their 50’s and 60’s, it tries to dismantle Planned Parenthood and while giving huge tax cuts to the wealthiest Americans and insurance companies.)

They say that politics makes strange bedfellows and this is one of those times.  So let’s be supportive to Senator Ted Cruz and continue to tell him to vote NO for the repeal and replace bill.

In case you needed some facts (real ones, not the alternative kind) here are some highlights of what the Republican bills would do, and how it would potentially affect Texans:

  • CBO estimates 22 million people would lose their healthcare coverage.  That includes 2.6 million Texans with the number of uninsured Texans increasing by 58% by 2019.
  • Women could be charged more for insurance just for being women.  Prior to Obamacare, women in Texas were charged as much as 56% more than men for the same coverage.
  • Pre-existing conditions would either be decided directly by the states (House bill) or would allow states to request the ability to reduce essential coverage, meaning that the people who need that coverage would have to pay substantially more and insurance companies could impose lifetime caps on what they have to pay (Senate bill).
  • The oldest adults (ages 50 – 64) can be charged five times more for insurance.
  • Medicaid (insurance for the poor, disabled, kids and pregnant women) would be cut off from federal funding starting in 2020.  Approximately 4.7 million Texans, about 16% of the state’s population, rely on Medicaid for their health insurance.  The majority of Medicaid funding goes to people with disabilities.  Under this plan these services will likely be cut.
  • A one year block would be placed on Planned Parenthood reimbursement, which CBO estimates 15% of women would lose access to family planning services increasing the birth rate.  (And remember that Medicaid for the poor would also be cut, which includes care for pregnant women and newborns, and women could be charged more for insurance.)
  • If you are wealthy, according to CBO you get $563 billion in tax cuts over 10 years under the Senate bill, while the poor, pregnant, sick, elderly and disabled pay higher health costs for worse coverage.

For more information, you can read the full articles used to reference these numbers:  Who Wins, Who Loses With Senate Healthcare Bill and Defending Healthcare in 2017, What is at Stake for Texas?

The time to act is now.  This bill is set to go back to the floor this Friday.  Call Senator Cruz and pressure him to continue to vote no.  Our reasons may be different but a no vote from him will ultimately benefit Texas families.

 

Artist/Activist Lisa Anne Auerbach

Artist/Activist Lisa Anne Auerbach

Lisa Anne Auerbach is well known for her politicized knitwear—sweaters and other types of clothing hand and machine knit that include symbols or text that have a political meaning.  But in addition to knitting, she has also been working with other forms of textiles, photographs, zines, and in gouache.   She is interested in the ways in which humans communicate with each other, especially non-verbally through architecture and symbolism.

Lisa Anne Auerbach, “My Jewish Grandma is Voting for Obama/Chosen People.

During the election, Auerbach developed a series called “Make America,” a spin-off of Trump’s “Make America Great Again” slogan.  Auerbach said that,
“during the 2016 Presidential Election, one of the candidate’s slogans was “Make America Great Again,” which of course implies that America is currently not “great” but once was and could be again. I have no idea what he’s talking about, but I have some ideas for other things America might prioritize in the future.”

Image by Lisa Anne Auerbach

Since the election, she has continued with this “Make America” series but instead of in red, blue, and white, she is now working in black and white, resonating the sense of hopelessness many Americans are feeling—or symbolically representing the stark contrast between Obama and Trump’s version of America.

Image by Lisa Anne Auerbach

Auerbach said of the painting “Hurt People Hurt People” that, “One of my students said this in class in reference to bullying and I thought, “well, wow, maybe that explains it.” Hurt people like to blast off missiles and then they don’t hurt enough people so they drop a giant bomb and that doesn’t hurt enough people so they try to defund Planned Parenthood… I don’t feel sorry for the guy because he’s hurt; I just want him to take his slithering, destroyed, impaired and crackpot brain and get it someplace where he can’t hurt any more people. Outer space would be fine, as long as he can’t tweet from there.”

Image by Lisa Anne Auerbach

Auerbach has some words of wisdom for all of us resisting the agenda of hate. “You think it can’t get any worse; then the sun comes up and a new day brings even more chaos and scandal. The challenge is to stay informed but not let it make you nuts. Don’t go on total news strike, just take a day off. Don’t cancel your newspaper subscription; without a functioning press we are sunk. Take time to pull weeds or listen to some music or go on a hike. It’s Saturday and a beautiful day even though it seems like everything is shattering, the waters are rising, the air is clouding and our leadership is a simmering crock pot of madmen.”

Consider purchasing one of her grayscale paintings; the income from these works is being donated to organizations working to help Americans when the government fails them.


See more paintings on Auerbach’s instagram account @auerbachtoberfest

Check out Auerbach’s website for more images and information.

Texas Artist Activist Suzann Thompson is “Celebrating Doilies”

Texas Artist Activist Suzann Thompson is “Celebrating Doilies”

Textile artist Suzann Thompson believes that hand work is a deeply engrained element of activism in women’s culture and speaks to the ties between “stitching” and activism, citing how American women have engaged in these kinds of activities since the Revolutionary War when they boycotted British shipments of finished cloth and instead, wove their own rough cloth to make clothing and protest the Crown’s taxation policies.

Continuing in this tradition, her upcoming exhibit “Celebrate Doilies!” honors this heritage of needlework. She says that, “that Texas, especially rural Texas, has a deep heritage of crochet.” Women might not have had much, if any, expendable income but they could usually buy thread and used that to beautify their homes. Crochet was a cheap way to relax, be creative, and unwind, especially after a long day on the farm.

Thompson’s artwork uses vintage and antique doilies, combined with other fibers and embellishments, to create new works that honor and highlight the original doilies. She has been collecting doilies for a while, not certain what to do with them, when she overheard a man comment that he had many doilies made by female family members and that he did not want to part with them, but he didn’t know how to “deal with them,” either. That’s when she decided she would work do a series of doily inspired artwork that focuses on family heritage and legacy.

Two themes run through the upcoming “Celebrate Doilies!” exhibit: frugality and art as therapy. She tells the story of how a woman told her that her father crocheted at the end of the day to unwind. There were five kids in the family and he said that he had to crochet because it “calmed himself down.” She tells another story about a doily that was made entirely out of the string saved from chicken feed sacks. Talk about frugal!

To test out that possibility, Thompson saved the string from five large bags of cat food and was able to crochet a small heart. She knows now how many dozens of bags of feed it required to make that large doily and yet this homesteader persisted, using what materials she could pull to hand to beautify her home and, without realizing it, left a legacy of her own creativity.

Art by Suzann Thompson. Image by Suzann Thompson.

Thompson says that doilies and other handwork “tie us to our past and our families.” She recalls a quote from a woman that she once read who said of a crocheted blanket, “every inch of this yarn went through my grandmother’s hands. Her DNA is on this afghan.”

I’m not sure if the pussy hats knitted and crocheted over the last several months will be equally as valued in the future as have crocheted doilies but they are a current example of how handwork and craft are inherently personal acts that cross over into the political. If the “personal is political,” as second wave feminists like to say, then crocheted doilies are a prime example of how such small, inconsequential items can reverberate over time, becoming embedded with deep meaning.

Learn more about the Celebrate Doilies exhibit and Suzann Thompson’s art work. You can also find her on Facebook.

In addition to Thompson’s art, poet Sandi Horton is also featured in the “Celebrate Doilies!” Horton’s poetry and family crochet are included, and she will read a selection of her work at the show’s closing reception August 19th at the Cross Timbers Fine Arts Council.

This traveling exhibit begins in Stephenville and then moves to Granbury. If you are interested in hosting this exhibit, please contact the artist via her website. (link)

Additionally, Thompson is raising funds through Kickstarter to help the exhibit reach more people.

 

 

5 Progressive Candidates Won in Texas Runoffs!

5 Progressive Candidates Won in Texas Runoffs!

March On! Texas wants to give a big shout-out to all progressive candidates who made it to the runoff elections this past weekend and, more importantly, to all of YOU for showing up and voting.

In the initial election last month, to recap, Marchers identified 70 progressive candidates; 11 won and 16 had runoff elections.  Just counting the winners, that’s a success rate of about 16%.  Not great, but at least 9 of those 11 candidates were women, which is success in and of itself and also this is Texas.

Here’s the news that we find particularly encouraging.  Of the 16 candidates in runoff elections, 5 progressives won!  That’s about a 31% success rate.  Now there are lots of reasons why that number may have increased, but we have to think that voter turnout played a part.

Ron Nirenberg, winner San Antonio Mayor

So again, we want to take this moment to THANK YOU for tuning in, getting friends and family to vote, and showing up yourself on election day.  It clearly made a difference.

Let’s build on this momentum.  The 2018 midterm elections are barely 500 days away.  Do you want to turn Texas blue?  Because we sure do.  There will be volunteer opportunities coming up to help register people to vote, so stay tuned for more on that.

Do you know a Progressive candidate running in 2018?  Please let us know!  Email lisa@marchontexas so we can add them to our spreadsheet.

We CAN make a difference.

March on, y’all!